Tag Archives: corgi

Babies, More Babies, and Baking (not the babies!)

The critters around here think it’s Spring. I have eight (possibly more) bunnies born yesterday, with second doe due on Sunday. This, I will admit, is my doing, since I did enable the affair. They were certainly enthusiastic participants, however! I still have three from the previous litter – one of them I actually sold. This handsome little buck is going to be a pet – and possibly getting a girlfriend later on.

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The Snowflake Bobwhite quail have decided to try for a family too. I’m not overly optimistic about success, since Buckbeak (my male) suffered a leg injury as a chick and has never had perfect agility since. I’m not sure he’s able to properly balance on Bellatrix in order to fertilize those eggs. They are so sweet, though.

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Buckbeak has taken to sitting on the eggs with her, and when she leaves the nest to stretch and eat, he moves over to keep the eggs warm. I’m keeping my fingers crossed. I’d love to see them manage to hatch out at least a couple of chicks!

I’ve also had two different chickens decide to go broody on me, too – despite me explaining over and over again that we have already had our allotted chicks for the year, and we really can’t have any more.

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So they are taking turns in the broody prison. I just released the last one this morning…I hope she’s actually changed her mind about babies and isn’t just going to sneak back onto a nest when I’m not looking.

I FINALLY got the girls’ musical instrument mounted in their coop, right above the oyster shell and grit where I know they can’t miss it.

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They are pretending it isn’t there. Not a single hen will touch it. I guess my girls just don’t have dreams of going on America’s Got Talent or the Kimmy Kimmel Show.

The guinea pigs have moved out into the large outdoor coop, and are loving all the space.

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Of course, their favorite activity is still coming up the wire to beg for treats. Both are especially fond of cherry tomatoes.

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It’s been too smoky from all the wildfires to do much work outside, so I’ve been doing lots of cooking and baking. You know how you tend to pin things on Pinterest but never actually do them? Well, I’m making a point of making the recipes I’ve pinned, and most of them are turning out! A pretty good percentage are actually keepers, and I’ve transferred them over to a new board “Recipes I’ve Made and Liked”.  Just yesterday, I made the Bacon-Wrapped Cornish Hens, and they were fantastic…and super easy. Besides the Cornish hens, I also made two apple pies with apples from my backyard tree (these apples make the most extraordinary pies…but I didn’t plant the tree, and have no idea what variety it is). One pie to bake immediately,

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and one to freeze for later.

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As you see in the background, I saved all the cores and peels to make three gallons of apple scrap vinegar. It’s so easy, and tastes just like store-bought apple cider vinegar. I use it for everything but canning. (Canning requires at least 5% acidity for safety, and I haven’t tested the acidity of mine.) Some apple scrap vinegar recipes tell you to start with yeast, or add sugar, or do all sorts of extra things. I do nothing but throw my apple scraps in a jar and add filtered water. Put some 90 grade cheesecloth over the top to keep out the fruit flies, and stir it vigorously at least a couple of time per day. You’ll notice it starts to bubble, and smell like hooch. Once the bubbles stop, and the apple scraps sink to the bottom after a few weeks, strain the scraps out, replace the cheesecloth and store the jars in a cool, dim place for up to six months. You’ll know it’s done when it smells and tastes like vinegar, and then you can bottle it up and use it like you would apple cider vinegar. When you make future batches, add a little of the dregs from your previous batch to kick-start the process.

In the same day, I also made Lemon Poppyseed Yellow Summer Squash Bread – you’ll find the recipe in my pinterest recipe link above. It’s a super way to use up those overgrown yellow summer squash, and you’d never know it has squash in it! I recommend cutting down the sugar by at least half a cup, though. Most comments on the recipe say it’s too sweet as-is, and I’m glad I followed their suggestion.

Dexter was glued to my side during all this baking frenzy, and boy was he ever exhausted by the end of it!

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It is hard work cleaning up all the scraps that accidently (and on purpose) fall to the floor. He didn’t even wake up during his close up.

img_6805_zps47aii80cIs someone talking about me? Are there more treats?img_6806_zpspj2nsaef

Finally, Amazon sent Bundy another cat bed in the mail, and this one, sadly, was slightly undersized.

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He did his best to make it work, though!

 

 

 

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Favorite YouTube Channels

Today I thought I’d show you a few of my personal favorite YouTube channels. First up is Dutchsinse. I LOVE this guy – he’s truly brilliant. You know how great scientific discoveries happen? There is the established “science” that everyone knows is true, and then there’s one maverick voice giving a contrasting opinion. Gravity exists. Germs are what cause disease. The earth travels around the sun. The earth is round. These guys are mocked, cursed, and often destroyed…but eventually, science comes around to the correct view.

Can earthquakes be forecasted similar to weather? Up until very recently, science said no. But Dutchsinse has been saying yes for eight years. Using only a commercially available program that lists earthquakes from approved governmental sources (USGS, EMSC, GeoNet) he tracks earthquakes across the globe, and proves they follow certain patterns across the globe. It’s fascinating, especially since science has now said that forecasting earthquakes IS possible, and they are currently testing out their theory – a theory which, might I say, is pretty much EXACTLY what Dutchsinse has been doing all along! The kicker for me is that the theory fits hand-in-glove with what the Bible says is true of earthquakes, that is absolutely the final authority for me. Check out his most recent video below:

Much love, Dutch!

In homesteading, my favorite guy is Justin Rhodes of Abundant Permaculture. He’s doing it right, folks – especially the way he’s raising his kids.  Love this recent video of his:

I’m totally getting a guard goose in the spring…if I’m still here on earth.

Next up is Jack Hibbs. This guy is amazing. Every single sermon of his is funny, humble, fascinating, and deeply passionate and insightful.

Then there is Amir Tsarfati of Behold Israel. Current middle eastern events and Bible prophecy, from a Jewish believer in Christ, and a former officer of the IDF.

And then there’s J.D. Farag. He’s a pastor is Hawaii who gives the most joyful and enthusiastic Bible Prophecy updates I’ve seen. A true man of God.

And lastly, here’s one from my own YouTube channel…my corgi Dexter getting a good head scratchin’.

Christmas, and Looking Forward to 2016

This Christmas was one of the best in nearly a decade. The extended family and their drama went elsewhere, and it was a quiet, peaceful Christmas with great food, excellent gifts, and an opportunity to attend our Christmas Eve church service. I actually made it through feeling relaxed instead of stressed out, and rather than being SO GLAD it’s over, I’m looking forward to next year.

This was Dexter’s second Christmas, and the first that he really understood what unwrapping was all about.

We also discovered the perfect way to apply flea medicine to a wiggly corgi…you use the sleeve of a sweatshirt to ardvark them!

It’s been rainy almost non-stop this fall and winter – we’ve set records for rainfall. Finally, though, we’re seeing the return of some sunshine, and it’s bringing on the desire to garden. I’ve been marking up my seed catalogs, and almost have my order ready to send. This year, I’m going to try to stick to tried-and-true varieties, because I’m making it a goal to grow as much greens/seeds for the animals as I can.

rabbitsI found this fabulous book on Amazon:Real Food for Rabbits: Raising Meat Rabbits Without Buying Commercial Feed.  Don’t be put off by the title if you only have pet rabbits – it’s all about feeding, and it applies just as well to pets. I’ve actually suggested to the author that she change the title.

I would LOVE to get all my critters off packaged, commercial food. The chickens are, but the quail and rabbits are (hopefully) being converted over to natural grains and veggies this coming year. I’ve seen so many benefits from the chickens being off commercial food. They are healthy and happy, and – biggest of all – their poop doesn’t stink. At all. I’m looking forward to having that be the case with the quail!

I don’t know if my meat rabbits will happen in 2016. I have a muscovy duck in the fridge ready to cook tomorrow, and assuming we like it as much as everyone says we will, I think I’ll be starting with a few meat ducks.  I’ll order the minimum order of 10 ducklings, save out the nicest trio for breeding, and eat (or sell) the rest. The nice thing about muscovies is how quiet they are, plus the females are terrific mothers.

muscovyI really like having the Indian Runner ducks in my garden. Other than a certain devilish attitude at bedtime sometimes, they are no trouble at all.  And every time I see them out the window, they make me laugh. I’ll be getting two more in the Spring. Either as chicks, or I’ll try hatching some eggs.

I’ll also be hatching more quail. I don’t remember if I told you guys, but I lost a female this Fall, bringing my numbers down to just four females and two males. I want to plump up the female numbers. And my friend lost all but one of her quails due to a predator attack. She didn’t wire in the bottom of her pen, and something dug through the rocks and gravel and killed all of them but one little male in one night. Put wire underneath your cages, folks. It might be a little more trouble and expense, but you never know when a predator will find your cage!

I’m keeping her lonely male with my females, until I get more quail hatched. Then she’s taking him back – I have enough males already!

So right now, that’s the big plan. Re-vamp the chicken yard area to make room for the muscovies, hatch more quail, and garden ALL THE FOOD.

Because seeds.

SAD

http://www.greensparrowgardens.com/2014/12/sad-seed-acquisition-disorder.html

Garden Update & Dexter’s First Beach Day

It is so unusually hot here – we’re having our August weather in June…which makes me concerned a bit about August.  Never thought I’d miss the rain!  But the beans, tomatoes, and squash sure love the heat. I think I’ll be canning beans in under a week.

Good thing, too, as we only have three cans left from the beans I put up last summer. I LOVE home canned beans! They are so much tastier than store-bought.

We’ll be eating summer squash by next week, too. Beans and squash are my favorite summer foods.

It’s been so long since my last update, that I didn’t post the pics I took a few weeks ago. Here’s the front yard vegetable then:

And here it is now. It’s a jungle!

Though the biggest jungle is inside the greenhouse.

Look – we have the brick floor in! And there are SO MANY green tomatoes.  The melons in there are flowering now, too. I’m hopeful that I’ll actually get a bunch of homegrown melons this year.  Early on, I noticed the three peppers I have in there were getting attacked by aphids.  In the outdoor garden, this would be absolutely NO reason for concern, as within days, the beneficial insects would find them, and demolish them.  I never spray anything in my garden, not even soap solutions. Though those are not nearly so harmful as pesticides, they still disrupt the natural cycle of predator/prey in your garden.  If you let the aphids be for a year, you’ll allow the beneficials to establish a base in your garden, and then you’ll never need to spray anything, ever again.  It’s simply amazing to observe.

Inside the greenhouse, I wasn’t sure if a natural balance would be able to happen, but guess what?  After about a week of tolerating aphids on my peppers, the aphids just suddenly disappeared completely! If I’d had to keep the greenhouse door closed during the day, the beneficials probably wouldn’t have been able to find their way inside, but with this hot weather…yeah, it’s an awesome June for the garden and the good bugs!

We’ve done a few more improvements to the chicken coop/yard, with still more to come.

Inside the coop, mom tore out the upstairs loft. She had never been happy with it, and she finally managed to turn me around to her point of view.

Now the girls just have perches along the back wall, with a wind barrier of straw bales in front. Before winter, we’ll have to put in a little more protection, but it’s working for now.

I also got the signs I designed and painted up.

Each girl has her name, along with a picture of the egg she lays. Plus, a blackboard to write their requests/demands.

Outside in the yard, we’re working on making it more chicken-friendly (more shade, more secret nooks, more edible perennials for them and us). So far, we’ve put up two hog panel trellises.

One has two varieties of grapes growing up it:

And beyond that, to the side against the fence, is another with thornless blackberries and a (still-to-be-planted) rose.

Complete with bench, for sitting and holding chickens. Once the vines get a chance to grow up, it will be very nice for all of us.

The neighbor on the other side of the yard finally put up the fence he’s been talking about since he moved in. It’s probably the most white-trashy fence I’ve ever seen (the posts are all cut to different heights, and the boards are nailed on a definite slant), but it does the job. It’s so nice to have privacy again! And now we can tear down the falling-apart fence that used to be there.  We said we’d tear it down for him before he started building his, but he said he wanted to take it down himself.  Then, he just left it up, and built his new fence in further on his property. So he just gave us about ten inches more land!  Woot!  😉  He’s an very odd man.

The new fence extends into the side front, which is very nice. And from this view, you can see just how uneven those posts really are!

Anyway, now that there’s a fence, this just became prime real estate. I’m thinking a bunch of raised beds (the ground’s truly bad here) with raspberries? It gets excellent sun.

Yesterday, we took Dexter to the beach for the first time.

He loved it, but had serious concerns about the sea monsters that kept passing by in the water. We tried to explain what boats are, but he knows what a sea monster is when he sees it, and he knows it is part of his job to keep a wary eye out to sea.

He did love the water though – even though the waves did freak him out at first.

He was so exhausted on the way home. He just collapsed in the back seat, and didn’t move.

Dreaming of Green

It’s always right after Christmas that I start hungering to be out in my garden.  The seed and livestock catalogs start arriving, and I find myself browsing Pinterest and placing seed orders.

Yesterday, I ordered the second one-year-old pear tree I’m going to train as an espalier.  The one I planted last year is doing splendidly.  This one is a variety called “Seckel”, and the fruit are tiny, tiny little pears with a sweet flavor.  So sweet, they are often called “sugar pears”.

pear_seckel2I have also tracked down a local supplier of honeybees, and ordered a replacement package and queen for this Spring.  At least I’ll be able to ensure that the queen is alive and all is well with the bees before I take them home, so hopefully they will survive this time around.  I loved having the bees around last summer.

Two of the major projects this Spring will be building a greenhouse and a duck coop.  I will be getting three little Indian Runner ducklings.  I’m really looking forward to the arrival of the ducks, because if there is anything cuter than ducklings, I can’t think what it might be.

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The greenhouse was originally going to be a really small one, just barely large enough to stand inside of, but I’ve reshuffled some plans, and found a location where I can have a larger one.  Like this, sort of:
greenhouseI’m hoping to keep one of the quail colonies inside it year round, if I can get the temperature regulated enough to not to cook them during the summer.  Having birds in the greenhouse will help control aphids and other pests.

The Chickens are helping with the pre-gardening.  I released them out into the garden yesterday for a little judicious slug-egg hunting, and they took to the job with great zeal.

Besides dreaming of gardening, I’m also seriously into holiday planning.  I just bought this gorgeous handmade hemp hat for wearing in Egypt.  I’d been looking for a durable, packable, awesome hat for months now, and as soon as I saw this one, I knew it was the one.

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Dexter is about 5 months old now, and completely wonderful…except when he’s being completely naughty.  He’s so gorgeous.  I love him to bits.

Have YOU hugged your chicken today?

The garden is pretty much over for the year, although I still have a fall crop of snap peas and bush beans coming on.  I didn’t do much else for fall planting, although I did get garlic in, and left quite a few beets, chard, and collards that I hope will overwinter.  They often do, in my area.

I’m hoping we’re going to have a mild winter this year.  So far, it looks like it.  Fall has been extraordinarily warm – we haven’t even been tempted to heat the house yet.  Some days, it’s been positively balmy outside.  It would be a godsend for my building projects, except for the fact that it’s also been high winds almost every day and lots of rain.  Oh, well…the building projects might have to be put off until early Spring this year.  Just as long as I can get the new housing up before the ducklings and meat chicks arrive!

We bought 18 pounds of chicken necks and backs, and made several pots of broth for canning.  It is so lovely to have homemade broth ready to go…especially if one of us gets sick.  It’s not a myth that chicken broth has healing qualities – but not the icky stuff you can buy in cans at the grocery store.  That stuff tastes like crap, and pretty much is, as far as nutrients go.  I’m experimenting with beef bone broth next.

Most of my free time has either been spent working on this three-book time travel series I’m publishing in (hopefully) January, and keeping constant eyes on Dexter the new Corgi puppy.  He hasn’t got the hang of housetraining yet, and likes to test his sharp little baby teeth on everything – especially shoes, socks, and anything made of paper.

Also, Happy Hug A Chicken Day!  Yes, this is a thing.  Yes, I did hug mine.

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Dexter wanted to hug them too, but the chickens weren’t amiable to that idea…

Corgi Puppy!!!!!

Yesterday, we rented a car and drove to SeaTac airport to pick up the newest addition to our family…our corgi puppy, Dexter.  He’s about 10 1/2 weeks old.

He was shipped from Carol’s Corgis, in Missouri, and didn’t have any problems at all with the flight.  He wasn’t scared, or stressed at all.

It was a good thing we hired a rental car for the trip, though, because on the way,  this happened.

Yup, in Seattle, going through an intersection, a driver ran the red light and hit us.  He tried to swerve away at the last second, which is why we were lucky, and it only go the front passenger tire area, rather than squarely in the passenger area, where Mom and I were sitting.  No one was hurt, and the other driver was very nice to deal with, thankfully.  The rental folks came and picked up the damaged car and gave us a replacement, and we were back on our way.  We were a little late picking arriving at the Air Cargo office, but Dexter had only arrived from his flight about 10 minutes earlier, so he didn’t have to wait.

That evening, he was too interested in looking around and exploring to rest, so when he got tired, I put him on my chest, on his back, and he just conked out.  Such a sweetie!

I think he’s going to be perfect for us.  He’s very calm about new things, and not fearful at all.  He and Cat Sookie are not friends yet, but they did touch noses, so I expect they’ll be fine once Sookie gets over her worry about a new animal.

The chickens were EXTREMELY concerned about him at first, but they are getting used to see him through the fence now, and are going about their business – as long as he doesn’t get too close.  He’s very calm with them, and doesn’t jump or bark or scratch at them, just sits quietly and watches them.  He doesn’t seem to be thinking of them as prey at all, which is good.

He has the BIGGEST feet, totally outsized to his body!  I love that.

He’s smart, too.  He’s already mostly figured out his name, and is learning “sit”.  His first night, he slept like a little angel, and seems to be settling in perfectly.  He absolutely adores playing in the yard.