Tag Archives: back to eden

Beginning the New Rabbit Colony Pen

Today was a lovely sunshiny day – very Spring-like. I’m betting that we are going to have an early Spring in the Pacific Northwest this year.  Although we will likely have a few more frosts, I think we’re past the hard freezes. I certainly hope so! But whether we are or not, these lovely days are giving me a chance to do a lot of yard work – including build the new meat rabbit colony house.

I think in my previous post, I shared a pic of the site where I’ll be building it, all full of pruned apple branches and various other messes. Today, I cleaned all of that out, and started preparing the site. Since it tends to be lower ground, and thus wetter, the first job was to raise it level. Since I have a former duck pen full of pea gravel that I want cleaned out, that’s what I did today. Shoveled gravel from here:

To here:

Since a very old apple tree is also here, I am working around it.  The pen dimensions are roughly laid out by the boards. The narrow end of the pen (closest to the camera), will have a gate, so I can divide off the buck if I decide he’s causing problems – or just doing his bunny-making job too well! The wide end, shown in the below picture, will be the doe’s quarters.

Over the gravel, I will lay hardware cloth to keep out rats, and then build the pen up from there. To increase the space, there will be various levels inside the pen, and I hope to allow the rabbits access to the rest of the east yard on a regular basis…especially when there are young rabbits in the colony. I will also have a “rabbit tractor”, to allow them lawn grazing privileges.

Speaking of rats… You know, guys, I do try to look on rats as ‘squirrels without fluff’ and allow them a little respect. Like everything else, they have their place in the world. But their place is not chewing holes in my studio wall, so they can get underneath the floor and and nest in the insulation.

I just found this yesterday, and needless to say, I am not pleased. Time to reduce the rat numbers! Last night I set out the Snap Trap, and bagged one extremely pregnant female. I’ll keep putting out the trap until I stop catching them, and then I’ll fix this hole…and perhaps add a bit of hardware cloth along this wall.

Yesterday, I also planted out a bunch of seeds. Brassicas, mostly…kale and cabbage…but also some early lettuce, in the cold frames.

And in the greenhouse, too!

I also started onions, which normally don’t do well for me. I never get large bulbs. But this is the year I will succeed, right? I’m trying Green Mountain Multiplyer onions, because you can leave any bulbs you don’t harvest in the ground, and they will reproduce naturally.

Last year, I started doing the Back to Eden gardening method, using wood chips as a deep mulch. Now the ground has unfrozen, I can see that the chips are already starting to improve the soil. So many earthworms! The chickens, granted access to the east yard “vineyard” are thrilled! You never saw such happy chickens.

Before I had the wood chips, I had to really restrict their access to this yard, because they would busily dig immense holes in the dirt, usually right at some poor plant’s roots. With the wood chips, the layers are so deep that they dig and dig, and before they reach the dirt, they have lost interest in that particular hole and moved on.  And like I said, tons of earthworms! Over the last couple days, they’ve been digging and eating…and then curling up together in a sunny corner to nap and purr with contentment. Yes – chickens do purr! If you search on YouTube, you’ll find quite a few videos. (Mine are too shy of the camera to purr on cue.)

As a result of this happiness, we are going to cover all parts of the chicken’s outside runs with wood chips. It looks much nicer than straw, and I won’t have to:

A) Buy the straw.

B) Run the risk of the straw being contaminated with pesticides, thereby contaminating my garden.

It’s good that the chickens have a new source of forage, because they are running out of the veggies from last summer. The kales are finally eaten completely, the bags of tomatoes I froze for them are almost gone, and the kohlrabi are down to the last few. And looking pretty nasty – though still tasty to the girls!

Thankfully, signs of Spring are everywhere!

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Out of Eden Goes Back to Eden

One of the reasons I’ve been lax on posting lately is because I’ve been working crazy-mad in the garden. We have new ducks (which I’ll post about later), and we’ve been hauling in wheelbarrows full of gravel (for the duckyard) and wood chips (for mulch).

Have you heard of the Back to Eden gardening method? If not, you can watch the film for free here: http://www.backtoedenfilm.com/

Basically, you use wood chips for a mulch, and it provides incredible benefits for your soil and plants – including not needing to water anything other than new seedlings. After last year’s drought, I’m very attracted to this concept! Plus, if you live near a tree-trimming service, you can usually get their chips delivered to your door completely free.

Which we did. Two of these piles.

After shoveling dirt and gravel, it’s surprisingly pleasant work to haul chips. They are light, and they give such instant gratification.

We put a layer of chips over all the dirt areas of the garden, and a few small areas, like below, where we had grass, but found it awkward to mow such small spaces. In the future, I may plant a green groundcover here, or I might leave it chips. I do like the woodsy effect of the chips.

I also put it over the entire vegetable garden.

The chips that appear brown in the pictures are from the first load, and have had time to decompose a little. The greenish chips are from the second load, and still fresh. Lots of evergreen needles. It smells like Christmas!

Perhaps because of the smell/prickly nature of evergreen needles, I’ve noticed that slugs are keeping away from my plants. Slugs love marigolds, and for awhile I had some planted with chips around them, and some with just a straw mulch. The ones in straw were being eaten; the ones in chips weren’t. Nice.

Also, did you notice my espalier pear tree? It’s doing so well!

No blossoms yet, but hopefully next year?

After we spread the chips over all the dirt areas, we decided to continue on, and put chips on the gravel pathways, too. Gravel pathways are somewhat difficult to keep weed-free, and I’ve never been hugely attached to the look.

It’s only been a few weeks since we spread the chips, and already I see a difference. The earthworms are very active underneath, and I haven’t had to water, and the soil has, indeed, stayed moist. The real test will be later this summer, but I have high expectations.