The Kings are Here!

I didn’t sleep well last night, and I woke up super early this morning, and couldn’t get back to sleep. Today, my Utility King pigeons were coming in the mail, and mailing live creatures is always a little perilous. I was reassured by the pigeon breeder, who said he’s been doing this a long time and has never lost a bird in the mail – but I couldn’t relax entirely until those birds were safely in their new coop.

They arrived in a fairly large box.

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And although all the ventilation holes were covered in breathable fabric so I couldn’t peek at them, I knew they were both alive by the amount of movement inside. As the postal worker said, as she handed the box to me, they were “kicking!” It did feel a bit like a can-can was going on in there!

As soon as I got home, I opened the box.

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Meet Emerson and Peabody, my first pair of Utility Kings!

They are quite large. Unlike quail, which I can easily pick up in one hand, these birds are definitely a two-hand operation.

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They were obviously and understandably a little freaked out by their experience in the United States Mail, but still remarkably calm about it. I think once they get used to their new home and to me, I’ll be able to handle them without difficulty.

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I’m very pleased with them, and if you’re in the market for a new breed of pigeon, I highly recommend Foy’s Pigeon Supplies.

4 responses to “The Kings are Here!

  1. They are beautiful!

  2. They look like . . . Superpigeons! Actually, the look like mountain doves, which are of course, much better than pigeons. (Mountain doves eat elderberries and madrone berries and such) Are they white?

    • They are pure white, and quite lovely. I think I read that somewhere back, they are descended from mountain doves! I’ll have to see if mine will eat elderberries.

      • Ask others who raise them first. Too any uncooked elderberries can make people sick. (Although I think they taste too icky raw to eat enough of them to get sick.) I doubt they are toxic to pigeons or doves, but it is worth asking.

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